Pattern Plants as Indoor Decorations

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Pattern plants (here, peace lilies) add a vibrant, earthy aspect to any home. Think too about choosing pots that suit the decor. Source: http://www.flowercouncil.co.uk

A Guest Blog by Vicky Layton

Decorating your home is always an exciting opportunity for you to add your personal touch, particularly if you’ve just moved house and you’re starting with a blank canvas. Your home design should reflect your family daily life as well as being a comfortable and practical living space. Greenery can add a vibrant, earthy aspect to any home, as well as providing you with cleaner air due to its filtering properties.

Pattern plants, in particular, bring another dimension to your home as a stylish accessory. What is a pattern plant exactly? They’re essentially plants with an extra something special, whether that’s patterned leaves or unusual flowers; they look great around the home.

So, whether you’re decorating from scratch or rejuvenating a tired room in your home, here’s a guide to using pattern plants as indoor decorations:

In the Lounge or Conservatory

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Add greenery to a lounge for a finishing touch. Source: Shabd Simon-Alexander, http://www.gardenista.com

The lounge and conservatory are living spaces where all the family congregate at the end of a busy day. Conservatories are a relaxing area that your guests are likely to spend a lot of time in whenever they come over, especially in summer, so the interior design of the room is important. Complement your conservatory furniture with a dash of greenery. Greenery can add life and color to an otherwise minimal room. The best part of greenery in a lounge or conservatory is dotting them around to create a subtle yet beautiful overall aesthetic. Pattern plants that work well in a lounge or conservatory include: watermelon peperomia, zebra plant and peace lily.

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Watermelon peperomia (Peperomia argyreia). Source: shop.pistilsnursery.com

  • Watermelon peperomias (Peperomia argyreia) have a gorgeous reddish tint on the stems and underside of the leaves, ideal if your lounge color palette includes warming colors.

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    Zebra plant (Calathea zebrina). Source: hortology.co.uk

  • Zebra plants (Calathea zebrina) are aptly named because of the zebra pattern running down the leaves, a beautiful art deco style plant that looks wonderful in the living room.
  • Peace lilies (Spathiphyllum) are dark green with white “flowers” (which is actually a white leaf that grows hooded over the real flowers). They look sensational against a bold wallpaper or places in the middle of a coffee table for a touch of sophistication.

Bedroom Decoration

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Plants in the bedroom clean the air and give extra oxygen. Source: www.houseandhome.ie

Your bedroom decoration doesn’t need to please everyone’s tastes: it’s your own private retreat. When it comes to delicate pattern plants in your bedroom, the options are endless.

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Satin pothos (Scindapsus pictus). Source: pistilsnursery.com

Satin pothos (Scindapsus pictus) looks smart and polished. The leaves have a silvery pattern and a beautiful teardrop shape.

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Prayer plant (Maranta leuconeura). Source: carlosbato-arte.blogspot.com.

Similarly, a prayer plant (Maranta leuconeura) has interestingly shaped leaves, as well as symmetrical dark green patterns running through them. Don’t forget that the pots the plants grow in can also be an opportunity to add color and style.

For the Bathroom

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Succulents won’t live forever in most bathrooms, too dark for their taste, but you can switch them with other plants regularly, moving them into bright sun. Source: Nooches, Hannah Jackson

Many people don’t consider a bathroom as a prime place to include greenery in the home, but it’s a wonderful opportunity to add come character and color to the space. Bathrooms are typically white, mostly due to the white fixtures, so the contrast of green colors works particularly well. Low-maintenance plants are ideal for the bathroom, as it’s likely you’ll want to focus most of your attention on the main rooms in the house. Succulents such as cacti are popular choices as bathroom plants, as they require very little upkeep but look quirky and interesting placed on a bathroom shelf.

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The snake plant (Sanseveria trifasciata) tolerates low light better than most other succulents and is an ideal choice for the windowless bathroom. Source: www.waitrosegarden.

Snake plants (Sanseveria trifasciata) also need little attention, but the shape of the leaves and striped patterns will give the bathroom a boost of color and style.

Pattern Plants Around the Home

The next time you’re taking on a design project in your home and you’re gathering together the ornaments and finishing touches for decoration; consider a pattern plant as an unusual alternative.

20181002I Vicky Layton.jpgVicky Layton

Hi! My name is Vicky, I’m an interior designer, running enthusiast and occasional model. Fashion and design are and will always be my passions and I also love sports. I am currently doing an internship but I would love to open my showroom soon!

50 Houseplants That Don’t Mind Dry Air

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Most houseplants just don’t do well in desert-dry air! Source: pexels.com

Dry air is a major problem for houseplants in the winter… and indeed, any indoor plant (seedlings, cuttings, etc.). When the atmospheric humidity is less than 40%, certainly common enough in many homes, plants try hard to compensate by transpiring more heavily, that is, by releasing water to the air through their stomata (breathing pores). The drier the air, the more they transpire, and that can lead to their tissues losing water more rapidly than their roots can replace it. This can result in all sorts of symptoms of stress: wilting, flower buds turning brown, leaves curling under, brown leaf tips, even the death of the plant.

And if that weren’t enough, leaves stressed by dry air are also more subject to pest damage (red spider mites, whiteflies, thrips, etc.)

Some Plants Can Cope

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Plants with thick, waxy leaves cope better with dry air than those with thin ones. Source: davisla.wordpress.com.

That said, many plants, especially those native to arid climates or ones where they are exposed to long periods of drought, have developed ways of compensating for dry air. Cacti and succulents are usually very resistant to dry air and so are some epiphytic plants, like hoyas.

Some plants resist dry air by producing leaves with fewer stomata than normal, thus reducing water loss. Many have abandoned leaves altogether and breathe through their green stems (many cacti, for example). Others keep their stomata closed during the day, when the sun is hottest and water loss is greatest, breathing only a night. (This is called Crassulacean acid metabolism or CAM.) In other words, they essentially hold their breath 12 hours a day! Also, plants resistant to dry air often have extra-thick leaves or leaves coated with wax, powder or hair, all of which reduce evaporation.

Plants That Don’t Mind Dry Air

What follows are a few houseplants that don’t really mind it if the air in your home is on the dry side. Not that they will suffer if you increase the humidity to levels more acceptable to plants in general (most plants prefer a relative humidity of 50% or above) and that indeed is good for your health too, but if improving the atmospheric humidity something you just can’t do, at least these plants will pull through without a complaint!

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Aeonium arboreum ‘Atropurpureum’: one example of a plant that tolerates dry air. Source, Bernard Dupont, Wikimedia Commons

  1. Aeonium spp. (tree houseleek)
  2. Agave spp. (century plant)
  3. Aglaonema spp. (Chinese evergreen)
  4. Aloe spp. (aloe)
  5. Ananas comosus (pineapple plant)
  6. Aspidistra elatior (cast iron plant)
  7. Beaucarnea recurvata (ponytail palm)
  8. Cephalocereus senilis (old man cactus)
  9. Cereus peruvianus (Peruvian apple cactus)
  10. Ceropegia woodii (rosary vine)
  11. Clivia miniata (clivia)
  12. Crassula ovata (jade plant)
  13. Crassula spp. (crassula)
  14. Cryptanthus spp. (earth star)

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    The thick leaves of the dieffenbachia can generally cope quite well with drier air, but you can see just a bit of damage at the tip of this one. Source: Forest & Kim Starr, Wikimedia Commons

  15. Dieffenbachia spp. (dumbcane)
  16. Echeveria spp. (echeveria)
  17. Echinocactus grusonii (golden ball cactus)
  18. Epipremnum aureum (pothos, devil’s ivy)
  19. × Epicactus (orchid cactus)
  20. Euphorbia lactea (candelabra spurge)
  21. Euphorbia milii (crown of thorns)
  22. Euphorbia tirucalli (pencil cactus)
  23. Ficus elastica (rubber tree)
  24. Ficus lyrata (fiddle leaf fig)
  25. Gasteria spp. (ox tongue)
  26. Gymnocalycium mihanovichii friedrichii ‘Hibotan’ (red ball cactus)
  27. Haworthia spp. (zebra plant)
  28. Hippeastrum cvs (amaryllis)
  29. Hoya carnosa (wax plant)
  30. Kalanchoe (kalanchoe, panda plant)
  31. Ledebouria socialis (silver squill)

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    Few plants tolerate dry air as well as living stones (Lithops). Source: Dysmorodrepanis, Wikimedia Commons

  32. Lithops spp. (living stone)
  33. Mammillaria spp. (pincushion cactus)
  34. Opuntia spp. (bunny ears)
  35. Pachypodium lamerei (Madagascar palm)
  36. Pelargonium graveolens (rose-scented geranium)
  37. Pelargonium × hortorum (zonal pelargonium, zonal geranium)
  38. Peperomia obtusifolia, P. clusiifolia (baby rubber plant)
  39. Philodendron hederaceum oxycardium (heartleaf philodendron)
  40. Rhipsalis spp. (mistletoe cactus)
  41. Sansevieria trifasciata (snake plant)
  42. Schlumbergera (Christmas cactus)
  43. Sedum spp. (sedum, donkey’s tail)

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    The nearly round leaves of Senecio rowleyanus are designed to reduce evapotranspiration. Source: Forest & Kim Starr, flickr

  44. Senecio rowleyanus (string-of-pearls)
  45. Senecio serpens (blue chalksticks)
  46. Stapelia spp. (carrion flower)
  47. Streltizia reginae (bird of paradise)
  48. Syngonium spp. (arrowhead vine)
  49. Yucca elephantipes (spineless yucca)
  50. Zamioculcas zamiifolia (zeezee plant)20171227A pexels.com